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Policies and Procedures

Performance Management Procedure

Introduction

Global London College recognises the need for a procedure to help, encourage and enable all employees to achieve and sustain high work standards. The purpose of the procedure is to:

Ensure fair and consistent treatment for all employees;

Provide managers with a framework and guidance that will enable them to clearly communicate the standard of work expected and to ensure the standards are me;

Identify and implement mechanisms to enable the employee to reach the required standard of performance.

 

Issues Intended to fall within this procedure

Expectations for performance should generally be communicated at least annually via the appraisal scheme. However, there may be occasions when a manager becomes concerned that an individual’s work performance requires more support and guidance.

 

This procedure is designed to assist managers in supporting staff to reach an acceptable standard.

 

Initially, in situations where there is a decline in performance or where an acceptable performance level has never been achieved, a line manager should explore with the individual concerned the reasons or any underlying cause for a decline in their ability to carry out the role.

 

The manager should encourage an open and honest discussion of any underlying factors. Where health and/or attendance may be a factor in underperformance, the manager should escalate to operations director.

 

Where a member of staff is still in a probation period, the relevant probationary procedure will apply. This procedure applies to all staff and associates employed by Global London College.

 

Management Support

Where performance or poor attendance (detailed in sickness and absence policy) is considered by the line manager to be below acceptable standards, the normal course of action in the first instance would be to attempt to resolve problems with the employee in confidence and on an informal basis. The line manager will work supportively with the employee before entering the formal stages. A brief note will be made of the general issues discussed and the dates of any meetings. At this stage line managers are encouraged to set and clarify objectives, help with the prioritisation of action and agree timescales and review dates. It is anticipated that the majority of poor performance problems will be resolved in this way.

 

The formal procedure

This formal procedure may become necessary if initial management support does not lead to an improvement in performance. At all stages, the method to be followed by the manager will be:

To investigate the facts and circumstances of the under-performance in an open and exploratory manner (under-performance can include poor attendance);

To state the problem{s) and provide the evidence to support this;

To give the opportunity for the employee to respond to the issues raised;

To state the expectations l.e. what acceptable performance should look like;

To identify the support, training and other resources needed to assist the employee in achieving the required standards;

To set a reasonable timescale over which performance will be monitored for improved performance.

Wherever possible targets and timescales should be agreed between the line manager and the employee.

 

Stage 1

The formal procedure should be initiated if there has been insufficient improvement following initial management support or where the matter is sufficiently serious that informal counselling is deemed inappropriate. The manager will consult the Operations Director for advice and guidance before taking formal action.

 

The line manager will invite the employee to a meeting. At all stages, all parties must make every possible effort to attend such meetings. The employee should be given a minimum of 5 working days’ notice of the time, venue and purpose of the meeting and prior to the meeting should be given copies of any relevant information and evidence. The employee will be advised of their right to be accompanied at the meeting by a trade union representative or another member of staff.

 

At the meeting the line manager will:

Explain the areas in which the employee’s performance falls below the standards expected;

Give the employee the opportunity to respond;

Set and agree an improvement plan (see appendix 1) incorporating targets, standards, deadlines and further support, training and guidance to help them improve their performance.

Set a reasonable time frame within which improvement is expected, usually no more than 3 months.

Arrange a date to meet at the end of this review period.

Advise the employee of their right of appeal against any outcome of the meeting.

Following the meeting, the manager will write to the employee within 5 working days to confirm the outcome. If the manager confirms that there is a performance issue to address, a first written warning will be issued. Employees subject to any formal performance warning will not ordinarily be entitled to incremental pay rises within 12 months from the date of the warning unless there is sufficient evidence of sustained acceptable performance in advance of the increment date (this will be at the discretion of Directors). A copy of the outcome letter should also be sent to the Operations Director to be placed on the employee’s personal file, accompanied by the improvement plan. Any warning at this stage will remain in place for 6 months. The manager will set up regular (at least monthly) progress review meetings during the review period. At the end of the review period, the manager will confirm to the employee whether performance has become satisfactory or if further action is necessary. This will be confirmed in writing.

 

Stage 2

Where there has been insufficient improvement following Stage 1, or where the matter is sufficiently serious to progress directly to Stage 2, the line manager will invite the employee to a Stage 2 meeting, which will follow the same format as for Stage 1.

 

For immediate progression to Stage 2 the performance of an individual would include actions which, if not corrected, could represent a risk to the organisations essential operations, finances or reputation.

 

Having heard the case, the manager will determine whether a final written warning should be issued. Any warning at this stage will remain in place for 12 months. The employee may be required to participate in further training or development and further targets will be set to be achieved over a review period.

 

The employee should be advised that unless improvement over a sustained period of time is evident at the end of the review period, the matter will progress to Stage 3, at which redeployment or termination of employment may result. At the end of the review period, the manager will advise the employee whether performance has become satisfactory or whether further action will be taken under Stage 3.

 

Stage 3

Where there has been insufficient improvement or where the matter is sufficiently serious to progress directly to Stage 3, the case should be investigated and reviewed by Operations Director.

 

Consideration of dismissal for capability related to ill health or poor attendance may also be reviewed this stage.

 

The employee will be given a minimum of 5 working days notice of the time, venue and purpose of the meeting along with copies of any relevant evidence that is to be referred to at the meeting. The employee will be advised of their right to be accompanied at the meeting by a trade union representative or another member of staff.

 

Self-employed team member should refer to the contract with GLC concerning underperformance and termination of services

 

Stage 3 meetings will be chaired by the CEO. For capability issues related to health, any medical advice will be considered. If medical advice is received which indicates that the individual is unfit to attend the Stage 3 meeting, all possible alternatives will be considered e.g. conducting the meeting at a different location, written submission of comments or a representative attending in place of the employee.

 

Updated: 24 February 2020